malformalady:

McDonald’s has been forced to open its first ever restaurant with a turquoise coloured sign after city planners said the signature yellow sign would be too garish. Officials in Sedona, Arizona told the fast-food giant they were unable to open a restaurant with the trademark yellow logo.This is due to the city’s strict regulations which prevent buildings from ruining the picturesque view of the desert.
Photo credit: Michael Wright/WENN.comhttp://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2739701/McDonald-s-forced-open-turquoise-coloured-restaurant-s-not-fast-food-giant-s-unusual-store.html?ito=social-facebook

malformalady:

McDonald’s has been forced to open its first ever restaurant with a turquoise coloured sign after city planners said the signature yellow sign would be too garish. Officials in Sedona, Arizona told the fast-food giant they were unable to open a restaurant with the trademark yellow logo.This is due to the city’s strict regulations which prevent buildings from ruining the picturesque view of the desert.

Photo credit: Michael Wright/WENN.com

55,912 notes

whitneymuseum:

Jeff Koons’s Play-Doh is made up of twenty-seven individual interlocking pieces of painted aluminum and took two decades to fabricate. Definitely not child’s play! http://instagram.com/p/rkLTIUsIEy/

whitneymuseum:

Jeff Koons’s Play-Doh is made up of twenty-seven individual interlocking pieces of painted aluminum and took two decades to fabricate. Definitely not child’s play! 

(via hankeatspaint)

8,420 notes

iseetheblood:

Erased de Kooning Drawing, 1953, Robert Rauschenberg http://www.tate.org.uk/tateetc/issue8/erasuregenteel.htm

iseetheblood:

Erased de Kooning Drawing, 1953, Robert Rauschenberg 

(Source: cupoftea1, via foaming)

1,959 notes

one of my main goals in life is to go to space. seriously… it blows my mind and i want to be a semi-astronaut… i just want to float around and do space activities maybe i will have to pay Richard Branson off or something

13 notes


sylvester ulv for balenciaga


sylvester ulv for balenciaga

sylvester ulv for balenciaga

(Source: goldtouch, via ciggis)

400 notes

Wafaa Bilal, '3rdi' (Third Eye), 2010-2011
Iraqi-American artist Wafaa Bilal became bionic for his piece 3rdi when he had a camera surgically implanted to the back of his head. It constantly transmitted photographs to his website and served to comment on the nature of surveillance, the mundane and the things we leave behind.

Wafaa Bilal, '3rdi' (Third Eye), 2010-2011
Iraqi-American artist Wafaa Bilal became bionic for his piece 3rdi when he had a camera surgically implanted to the back of his head. It constantly transmitted photographs to his website and served to comment on the nature of surveillance, the mundane and the things we leave behind.

Wafaa Bilal, '3rdi' (Third Eye), 2010-2011
Iraqi-American artist Wafaa Bilal became bionic for his piece 3rdi when he had a camera surgically implanted to the back of his head. It constantly transmitted photographs to his website and served to comment on the nature of surveillance, the mundane and the things we leave behind.

Wafaa Bilal, '3rdi' (Third Eye), 2010-2011
Iraqi-American artist Wafaa Bilal became bionic for his piece 3rdi when he had a camera surgically implanted to the back of his head. It constantly transmitted photographs to his website and served to comment on the nature of surveillance, the mundane and the things we leave behind.

Wafaa Bilal, '3rdi' (Third Eye), 2010-2011

Iraqi-American artist Wafaa Bilal became bionic for his piece 3rdi when he had a camera surgically implanted to the back of his head. It constantly transmitted photographs to his website and served to comment on the nature of surveillance, the mundane and the things we leave behind.

26 notes

windwrinkle:



Céline Tuloup

windwrinkle:

Céline Tuloup

(via ghostform)

18,131 notes

THE ROTHKO CHAPEL
The Rothko Chapel is an interfaith sanctuary formed around 14 monumental canvases by the artist Mark Rothko. The mission statement of the institute declares that its objective is to ‘inspire people to action through art and contemplation, to nurture reverence for the highest aspirations of humanity, and to provide a forum for global concerns’. Entrance to the building is free (donations are greatly accepted), and it is accessible to people from all walks of life every single day of the year. It has become a pilgrimage stop for thousands of visitors who are entranced by both its importance as an artistic masterpiece, but also as a contemplative environment for people of all religious beliefs. 
As it turned out, the Chapel and the paintings within it were Rothko’s final artistic statement to the world. Mark Rothko committed suicide a year before the Chapel’s opening on the 25th February 1970, aged 66. He had ingested an overdose of barbiturates and slashed arteries in his arms. Found by his assistant in Rothko’s New York City studio, the artist had been suffering from depression and had also been diagnosed with a mild aortic aneurysm. Mark Rothko never saw the completed Chapel and never installed the paintings; because he died before the building’s construction, many corrections and alterations have been made to the building throughout the years in keeping with his particular requests. 
The Rothko Chapel blurs the lines and distinctions between architecture and art, challenging these definitions in its aesthetic effect. A duo of dichotomies is present within the space — firstly, Johnson and Rothko’s attempted collaboration in its design and secondly, the origins of Catholic faith as opposed to the humanitarian approach preferred by Rothko. It is monumental as the only existing works by Rothko that resulted in a marked interplay between the building’s plan and the paintings. Shaping the setting for his pieces, the canvases were formulated with the space in mind; a complete and entire project driven wholly by the artist’s instincts.
It could even be said that The Rothko Chapel is one of the best examples of the whole artistic movement of modernism. Rejecting the traditional forms of the past in the model of a religious church, the nondenominational chapel is alive with the universal ceremony of human contemplation. It is a place that celebrates faith of all kinds, rallying in the progress for peace, freedom and social justice throughout the world.

THE ROTHKO CHAPEL

The Rothko Chapel is an interfaith sanctuary formed around 14 monumental canvases by the artist Mark Rothko. The mission statement of the institute declares that its objective is to ‘inspire people to action through art and contemplation, to nurture reverence for the highest aspirations of humanity, and to provide a forum for global concerns’. Entrance to the building is free (donations are greatly accepted), and it is accessible to people from all walks of life every single day of the year. It has become a pilgrimage stop for thousands of visitors who are entranced by both its importance as an artistic masterpiece, but also as a contemplative environment for people of all religious beliefs. 

As it turned out, the Chapel and the paintings within it were Rothko’s final artistic statement to the world. Mark Rothko committed suicide a year before the Chapel’s opening on the 25th February 1970, aged 66. He had ingested an overdose of barbiturates and slashed arteries in his arms. Found by his assistant in Rothko’s New York City studio, the artist had been suffering from depression and had also been diagnosed with a mild aortic aneurysm. Mark Rothko never saw the completed Chapel and never installed the paintings; because he died before the building’s construction, many corrections and alterations have been made to the building throughout the years in keeping with his particular requests. 

The Rothko Chapel blurs the lines and distinctions between architecture and art, challenging these definitions in its aesthetic effect. A duo of dichotomies is present within the space — firstly, Johnson and Rothko’s attempted collaboration in its design and secondly, the origins of Catholic faith as opposed to the humanitarian approach preferred by Rothko. It is monumental as the only existing works by Rothko that resulted in a marked interplay between the building’s plan and the paintings. Shaping the setting for his pieces, the canvases were formulated with the space in mind; a complete and entire project driven wholly by the artist’s instincts.

It could even be said that The Rothko Chapel is one of the best examples of the whole artistic movement of modernism. Rejecting the traditional forms of the past in the model of a religious church, the nondenominational chapel is alive with the universal ceremony of human contemplation. It is a place that celebrates faith of all kinds, rallying in the progress for peace, freedom and social justice throughout the world.

20 notes

Clouds cast thousand-mile shadows into Space when viewed aboard the International Space Station. Photos by geophysicist and current astronaut Alexander Gerst.

Clouds cast thousand-mile shadows into Space when viewed aboard the International Space Station. Photos by geophysicist and current astronaut Alexander Gerst.

Clouds cast thousand-mile shadows into Space when viewed aboard the International Space Station. Photos by geophysicist and current astronaut Alexander Gerst.

Clouds cast thousand-mile shadows into Space when viewed aboard the International Space Station. Photos by geophysicist and current astronaut Alexander Gerst.

Clouds cast thousand-mile shadows into Space when viewed aboard the International Space Station. Photos by geophysicist and current astronaut Alexander Gerst.

Clouds cast thousand-mile shadows into Space when viewed aboard the International Space Station. Photos by geophysicist and current astronaut Alexander Gerst.

Clouds cast thousand-mile shadows into Space when viewed aboard the International Space Station. Photos by geophysicist and current astronaut Alexander Gerst.

103 notes

Flying drone captures images of the Apple Campus under construction

Flying drone captures images of the Apple Campus under construction

15 notes