Wolfgang Laib, Yellow Square

Wolfgang Laib, Yellow Square

21 notes

Falling in love with yourself first doesn’t make you vain or selfish, it makes you indestructible.

Things I’ll teach my children  (via whitenes-s)

(Source: infl4ted, via boyirl)

202,733 notes

untrustyou:

Thomas Prior

untrustyou:

Thomas Prior

(via ovtro)

3,703 notes

ragdan:

Martin Conte

PH: Paolo Musa

ragdan:

Martin Conte

PH: Paolo Musa

(via ealou)

164 notes

babeooshka:

i got half of my hair removed

babeooshka:

i got half of my hair removed

18 notes

tenderbutch:

Wrinkly little fuck

tenderbutch:

Wrinkly little fuck

tenderbutch:

Wrinkly little fuck

23 notes

exam:

"Creamed" and "Glazed" by Kelli Vance

exam:

"Creamed" and "Glazed" by Kelli Vance

exam:

"Creamed" and "Glazed" by Kelli Vance

(via tenderbutch)

392 notes

andinthecrushofthedark:

sleepy sleepy

andinthecrushofthedark:

sleepy sleepy

14 notes


"And as things fell apart, nobody paid much attention."
Recent picture taken in Gaza.

"And as things fell apart, nobody paid much attention."

Recent picture taken in Gaza.

(Source: themuslimavenger, via cyure)

40,684 notes

Francis Alÿs - When Faith Moves Mountains
For his 2002 “When faith moves mountains” he literally transformed a common figure of speech into an action piece. In the mountains just outside Lima, Peru, Alÿs asked 500 volunteers to walk in a line and use a shovel to move the sand dune 10 centimeters from its original position. The work might be considered a social commentary on the shifting of the country from Fujimori’s dictatorship to democracy and a deeper questioning about the effective role of mass movements of people in causing such shiftings. Furthermore it might be seen as a cynical reading of the artist on the act of “believing” and the absurdity it entails: the effort sustained by the volunteers only produces a small change, which is invisible and unmesurable.

Francis Alÿs - When Faith Moves Mountains

For his 2002 “When faith moves mountains” he literally transformed a common figure of speech into an action piece. In the mountains just outside Lima, Peru, Alÿs asked 500 volunteers to walk in a line and use a shovel to move the sand dune 10 centimeters from its original position. The work might be considered a social commentary on the shifting of the country from Fujimori’s dictatorship to democracy and a deeper questioning about the effective role of mass movements of people in causing such shiftings. Furthermore it might be seen as a cynical reading of the artist on the act of “believing” and the absurdity it entails: the effort sustained by the volunteers only produces a small change, which is invisible and unmesurable.

27 notes